CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF LAW TEACHERS
L’ASSOCIATION CANADIENNE DES PROFESSEURS DE DROIT

Calt-Acpd

  • published Workshop Wednesday July 20 2022 in Home 2022-06-15 21:25:45 -0400

    Workshop Wednesday July 20 2022 @2PM EST

    OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY: A Primer and Strategic Mapping Exercise

    Wednesday July 20, 2022 2:00PM EST

    You will need to register in advance for this meeting by clicking here.

    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.Text in a circle reading Summer Sessions ACPD CALT 2022

    The COVID-19 pandemic has put worker health and safety at the forefront of the news. Over half the workforce of Cargill’s meatpacking plant in High River, Alberta contracted the virus, resulting in at least three deaths. SEIU Healthcare, a union representing front line workers, asked police to investigate after three personal care attendants died from COVID-19, which they had contracted at work. Occupational health and safety law is intended to ensure that workplaces are safe, but not many lawyers have any familiarity with it. Few law schools offer dedicated occupational health and safety courses, while in some others OHS may be touched upon in a related course, but in most the topic is entirely absent from the curriculum. This session aims to provide law professors teaching in adjacent areas of law (e.g., labour & employment; business associations law) with knowledge and strategies for incorporating basic occupational health and safety law into their courses.

    The goals of this session are two fold:  

    1. To provide law professors with a primer on occupational health and safety law, so that they feel more comfortable incorporating it into their classes, and 
    2. To provide law professors with space to consider where and how they might incorporate materials on occupational health and safety into their courses. 

    Anna Lund (Moderator), Associate Professor at University of Alberta, Faculty of Law

    Eric Tucker (Presenter), Professor at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University

    Eric Tucker will deliver the primer on occupational health and safety law.  Eric Tucker has published extensively on occupational health and safety law and teaches a dedicated seminar on the subject at Osgoode Hall Law School.  His primer will cover the following questions   

    • What are the key policy goals of occupational health and safety law? What are the big ideas that illuminate this area?
    • What are key sources of occupational health and safety law? What resources could a law professor draw on to learn more about it?
    • Why is it important for students to understand occupational health and safety law? In what circumstances will they encounter it in practice?
    • What are some of the new and current questions in occupational health and safety law and scholarship?

    Attendees at this session will be invited to take part in a mapping exercise.

    First, they will be asked to identify where they may already be covering occupational health and safety law in their courses.

    Next, they will be invited to consider where they might try to incorporate it more substantively in future iterations of their course.  

     


  • Workshop Wednesdays: July 6 2022 12PM Eastern

    The Open Casebook Revolution

    Please register in advance for this meeting by clicking here. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.
    The open access law book “revolution” (as named by  The Faculty Lounge), is gaining momentum. Open access law books are materials compiled and edited for law students, practitioners and/or the public that are freely hosted on websites and as downloadable, searchable, printable, mark-up-able PDFs. In the United States, dozens of open access law casebooks are popping up on platforms such as SSRN, Open Textbook Library, eLangdell and H2O.

    old library in perspective, looking down symmetrical rows of shelves

    In Canada, CanLII hosts Professor Beswick’s casebook, Tort Law: Cases and Commentaries, and Messrs

     Fiddick and Wardell’s handbook, The CanLII Manual to British Columbia Civil Litigation. These materials are freely available alternatives to commercial cas

    ebooks and handbooks, which are typically expensive, heavy, and have a short shelf-life.  

    Open access law books have clear practical, pedagogical and societal advantages. On the practical side, compared to commercial alternatives, open access books are simpler to edit, faster to publish, easier to update, and free. On the pedagogical side, they empower flexibility and innovation. They can be more readily structured to suit the editor’s teaching aims. They can link to podcasts 🎧, videos 📺, blogs, news, articles, books, and judgments. Readers can keyword search and highlight text. Students don’t break their backs carrying them. They can also be integrated with quizzes and exam exercises. On the social side, open access legal materials advance access to justice. Commercial materials are often beyond the reach of the public and, in some cases, students.

    Open access legal publications help to keep the law accessible.  

    This roundtable  will appraise and praise the practical, pedagogical and societal benefits of open access law books for law teachers, students and lawyers. We will begin by taking 10 minutes each to highlight the design innovations of our respective books and the impact we see them having.

    We will then discuss among ourselves and with attendees the tricks and challenges for making such materials. We hope to encourage others to venture into creating open access casebooks, handbooks and other resources for students and curious members of the public.  

    Sarah Sutherland (session chair), President and CEO, Canadian Legal Information Institute

    • Samuel Beswick, Assistant Professor, Peter A. Allard School of Law, University of British Columbia (presentation slides)
    • John Fiddick, Director, Whitelaw Twining.
    • Cameron Wardell, Partner, Mathews, Dinsdale & Clark LLP

    text in a circle reading Summer Sessions ACPD CALT 2022


  • WORKSHOP WEDNESDAY June 29 12:30EST

    INCORPORATING LAW AND DISABILITY INTO THE CURRICULUM

    June 29 1230-2PM EST

    Please register in advance for this meeting: click here. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

    22% of Canadians over the age of 15 have at least one disability. Graduates of law schools will serve clients with disabilities, work alongside colleagues with disabilities and may themselves have or acquire disabilities over the course of their career. Key competencies for graduating law students include being familiar with how the law conceptualizes and addresses disability and having frameworks to critique the shortcomings of the existing law.  

    The aims of this session are

    (1) to provide concrete examples of how topics relevant to meeting the legal needs of individuals with disabilities can be incorporated into a wide range of courses across the law school curriculum and

    (2) to engage law professors in a discussion of these topics.  Each participant will discuss a different area of law and how they bring awareness of the lived experiences of persons with disabilities into their classroom teaching.   

    The session will touch on:  

    • models of disability and theoretical underpinnings 
    • equality and human rights law 
    • accessibility legislation (including the federal Accessible Canada Act)
    • employment law
    • benefits law
    • criminal law
    • tort law 
    • administrative law 
    • mental health law  

     

    Time will be reserved after the roundtable for a dialogue among participants and attendees.  

    The session participants include the contributors to Law and Disability in Canada: Cases and Materials (Toronto: Lexis Nexis Canada, 2021) and David Lepofsky, a longtime disability rights activist, who has a forthcoming article in the Windsor Yearbook on Access to Justice entitled, “People with Disabilities Need Lawyers Too! A Ready-To-Use Plan for Law Schools to Educate Law Students to Effectively Serve the Legal Needs of Clients with Disabilities, As Well As Clients Without Disabilities”.  

    Anna Lund, Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Alberta (moderator)

    • Odelia Bay – PhD Student, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University and co-author Law and Disability in Canada: Cases and Materials
    • Ruby Dhand – Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, Thompson Rivers University and co-author Law and Disability in Canada: Cases and Materials.
    • David Ireland – Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Manitoba and co-author Law and Disability in Canada: Cases and Materials.
    • Laverne Jacobs – Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Windsor and lead author and General Editor, Law and Disability in Canada: Cases and Materials.
    • Richard Jochelson – Dean, Faculty of Law, University of Manitoba and co-author Law and Disability in Canada: Cases and Materials
    • Freya Kodar – Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Victoria and co-author Law and Disability in Canada: Cases and Materials.
    • David Lepofsky – Disability Advocate, Adjunct Professor of Law, University of Toronto and Chair of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance.