CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF LAW TEACHERS
L’ASSOCIATION CANADIENNE DES PROFESSEURS DE DROIT

Call for Proposals 2020 CALT conference

Call for Proposals 

Canadian Association of Law Teachers Conference

Western University

London, ON

1-3 June, 2020

We are pleased to release this Call for Proposals for the 2020 annual conference of the Canadian Association of Law Teachers, which is being held as part of the 2020 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences and includes an overlap day with the conference of the Canadian Law and Society Association. The program for the overlap day will be co-ordinated to encourage integrated participation.

The Congress theme is “Bridging Divides: Confronting Colonialism & Anti-Black Racism”, which has been explained as follows:

Congress 2020 will encourage multidisciplinary engagement under the broad concept of bridging divides, while specifically emphasizing the dispossession of Indigenous peoples and the enslavement of Africans in the new world. Settler colonialism, as part of a broader imperial project, erases Indigenous peoples by appropriating land and delegitimizing traditional knowledge, and dehumanizes Black people, subjecting them to the tropes of everyday anti-Black racism. As we come together to confront white privilege and white supremacy, and examine experiences shared by Indigenous peoples and African Canadians, we also invite our community to reflect critically on social, ethnic, political and epistemological divisions more broadly, forming a future vision that bridges divides between divergent ways of knowing and navigating our world.

More information on the origins and objectives of the theme is available here.

We invite proposals that offer a perspective on the theme of ‘Bridging Divides’ in the context of legal education and the teaching and learning of law.  We encourage proposals addressing colonialism and/or anti-Black racism, but also welcome proposals engaging with other divides implicating ‘divergent ways of knowing and navigating our world.’  As well, the CALT conference organizers anticipate a role in arranging ‘CALT-sponsored’ theme-related sessions and so invite suggestions for sessions or speakers and expressions of interest in co-arranging specific sessions.

In addition, we are happy to consider proposals that address non-theme topics and issues of current interest in legal education and law, but preference may be given to theme-related proposals and proposals that address teaching and learning.

Proposals can be either of two types: session or individual.

  • Session proposals should include at least 3 contributors and address a unifying topic, with a total duration of either 60 or 90 minutes, including activities and/or discussion. Sessions are usually in either of three formats: topic panels (multiple successive individual presentations); topic workshops (multiple contributors utilizing non-panel active learning approaches); or, topic roundtables (multiple contributors facilitating an interactive discussion and exchange).  Other session formats may be proposed. Session proposals should be contained in a standalone Word document (i.e. not in the body of en email) that is no longer than 2 pages and must provide the following information:
    • Session title and proposed duration;
    • Session format (panel, workshop or roundtable or other);
    • Brief description of session topic;
    • Identification of session chair (who need not be a session presenter);
    • Titles of individual contributions (for panel format);
    • Brief description of individual presentations (for panel format);
    • Brief description of session content and roles (for workshop or roundtable);
    • Brief biographical information for each contributor (including institutional affiliation and position title or program status).
  • Individual proposals should identify a topic to be addressed by a presentation of no more than 15-20 minutes. Individual proposals should be no longer than 1 page and must provide the following information:
    • Presentation title;
    • Brief description of presentation content;
    • Brief biographical information (including institutional affiliation and position title or program status).

Please send all proposals, in Word format, as well as any suggestions or expressions of interest, to <calt.conference.acpd@gmail.com> no later than Monday 25 November.  The Program Committee will review all proposals and make selections based on relationship to the conference theme, anticipated interests of attendees (substance and formats), potential for interactive exchange and learning impact, and scholarly quality. The Program Committee may request additional information and modifications.  Individual presenters will usually be combined into panel-format sessions, with unifying topics where possible.  Please note that all proposers and contributors who are eligible for CALT membership must be members at the time of the conference (the annual CALT membership period now commences with the start of the annual conference).  According to Congress rules, all presenters and contributors must register for both Congress and the CALT conference.  Conference fee information will be available on the Congress website from early January 2020. Please also note that all participants must meet their own expenses.


CALT conference 2020 - SAVE THE DATE

The Canadian Association of Law Teachers is delighted to announce that the 2020 annual conference will be held at Western University, London, Ontario from 1-3 June. The conference is being held as part of the 2020 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences and includes an overlap day with the conference of the Canadian Law and Society Association. Please mark the date on your calendars!  Our Call for Proposals will be issued soon.


CALT Statement in Support of BCSA

CALT Statement in Support of the Black Canadian Studies Association (BCSA) and Against Racial Profiling and All Forms of Anti-Black Racism

We, the Canadian Association of Law Teachers (CALT), express our full support for the Black Canadian Studies Association (BCSA) statement, issued on June 4, denouncing an incident of racial profiling and anti-Black racism against a Black graduate student member of BCSA during Congress 2019 at UBC.

As an association with many members engaged in equality and anti-discrimination research, education and advocacy on a daily basis, we condemn all forms of racial profiling, anti-Black racism and discrimination. We are deeply concerned about the apparent failure of Congress/Federation of Social Sciences and Humanities (FSSH) to appropriately respond to this incident. We should note that we are aware of numerous other incidents in which Black people and other racialized people are assumed not to belong in academic spaces, and are accused of theft. Despite the unfortunate regularity of such occurrences, this is an issue of extreme importance that calls for urgent action. We support the demands set out in the BCSA statement, which we reproduce below. We urge the FSSH to immediately address the BCSA demands and to give the highest priority to implementing measures to support and promote racial equality and inclusion at Congress that engages academic attendees, Congress staff and local partners, vendors and service providers.

  1. The Federation immediately issue a public response acknowledging this incident, asserting zero tolerance for racial profiling and all forms of anti-Black racism, and a commitment to work with the BCSA to ensure that Congress is a welcoming space and experience for our members;
  2. Ensure delivery to the two accusers involved, a letter that will be prepared by the BCSA in response to this incident;
  3. The mention of anti-Black racism be added to the theme of Congress 2020: Bridging Divides (for example, Bridging Divides and Confronting Anti-Black Racism);
  4. If the BCSA remains a member association of the Federation, the waiving of the association’s fees for Congress 2020.

 


Call for Proposals CALT conference 2019

We are pleased to release the Call for Proposals for the 2019 CALT conference, to be held as part of the Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities at UBC, 5-7 June, 2019.  DON'T WAIT ... Deadline for proposals is Tuesday 20 November


Call for CALT Prize and Award Nominations 2019

We are pleased to Call for CALT Prize and Award Nominations 2019. Updated information now available via links below. Deadline 21 January 2019.


CALT 2017 Conference Dates

We are pleased to announce that the 2017 Conference of the Canadian Association of Law Teachers will be held at the University of Victoria from June 8-10, 2017, with the Association for Canadian Clinical Legal Education (ACCLE). We are currently planning the agenda and will post the program as it evolves.  We hope to see you in June.


"So what's the point?" : Practical language in pratical teaching in the law school

Sara Ross is entering the third year of her PhD at Osgoode Hall Law School, where she has served as an Instructor for the Legal Process class over the past two years. She is also a member of the Law Society of Upper Canada, holding an LLB and BCL from McGill, as well as an LLM from the University of Ottawa, and is the Graduate Student Representative for the Canadian Association of Law Teachers Board of Directors.

This post was derived from an inter-faculty workshop given at the York University Teaching and Learning Conference: “Teaching In Focus”, on May 20, 2016 in Toronto, Ontario.

A frequent complaint heard among law students after graduating from law school is that they have been inundated with information, without feeling that they have been taught the actual skills they need to be a lawyer. In my own classroom this year I have focused on using language that links everything I teach to how the student will use it in a practical context, such as a law firm, the courtroom, and so on. Couching everything within this context allows students to not only build their understanding of legal concepts; it provides them with a way of better connecting this knowledge to a professional skill set. This is what I call the “So, what’s the point?” approach.

You might also frame this “So, what’s the point?” approach as “point-first learning” or “point-first teaching”. As lawyers and within the law school context, our distinct focus on writing, arguing, and, in general, presenting our legal arguments in a point-first manner—leading with the ultimate point that we wish to get across to, for example, a judge or a decision-making panel—is something that can take time to instill in new law students. To aid in this transition, it can be intuitive to teach law in this manner too, and helpful to carry this approach into how we structure a law student’s learning environment and classroom experience. This method of instruction can reinforce what point-first argumentation and writing looks like, but there are benefits beyond this.

Teaching through a “So, what’s the point?” approach also speaks to and draws on an experiential education focus. As law schools are seeking to transform many of their courses into experiential opportunities—legal clinics, and so on—the desire and need to respond to and incorporate the practical element of learning and education is apparent. Encapsulated within this is the need to develop the practical skills needed within the legal employment path a student will eventually choose. And thinking about the skills or concepts you’re teaching in a “So, what’s the point?” manner helps bring an experiential element into the classroom; highlighting the real-world application of what the student is learning.

Read more

The flipped classroom in action

Many Professors are interested or curious about the Flipped Classroom, but unsure how it works, or what it actually means to "flip" a course in this way. In this video, produced by Peter Sankoff of the University of Alberta, Faculty of Law, with the assistance of students from his flipped Evidence law class from 2015, he breaks down in detail how the class proceeds - from start to finish – by showing what a "mock" class looks like. You'll also hear his thoughts on the flipped classroom, and better yet, the views of students who can tell you whether it works for them. 

http://ualbertalaw.typepad.com/faculty/2016/05/the-flipped-classroom-in-action.html

 

If you have any comments or questions, feel free to contact Peter at psankoff@ualberta.ca .


CALT's 2016 annual conference!

THE TRUTH AND RECONCILIATION COMMISSION RECOMMENDATIONS ON LEGAL EDUCATION AND ACCESS TO JUSTICE AS CENTRAL THEMES OF THIS YEAR'S CONFERENCE 

 

Our programme has been finalized and it is an amazing lineup of panels and roundtable discussions, thanks to your stimulating and inspiring proposals. This year’s conference will take place May 30th-31st at the University of Calgary Faculty of Law (with our Awards reception on the 29th).

We are dedicating an entire day of the conference to the T&R Commission recommendations on legal education. This will be on the joint day with CLSA (Canadian Law and Society Association), on May 30th.  Our plenary panel features inspiring scholars Larry Chartrand, Aimée Craft, Sarah Morales, Karen Drake and Rebecca Johnson, who will start the day off by asking difficult questions and guiding us in taking action individually and collectively. The other sessions will incite even more discussion and exchange about implementing the recommendations in different courses and contexts.

Access to justice is another crucial and current issue in the legal profession and in legal education this year, and it is also a central theme of this year’s conference, with three panels running back to back on the second day of our conference.

And of course, as has been CALT’s practice for the last few years, legal education curriculum and pedagogical issues and ideas will be shared and discussed! We’d like to end things with a discussion on creating and maintaining communities of practice, thus hopefully bringing the different discussions while turning to future action.

The CALT and CLSA joint banquet will be held on May 30th at the Calgary zoo!

Since most of you will be arriving at least on the 29th (CLSA conference starting on May 28th), we are hosting a wine and cheese reception on that day at 5pm to honour this year’s recipients of the CALT awards: academic excellence, scholarly paper, and our new scholarship of teaching and learning award.

To register for the conference, see the Congress website (http://congress2016.ca/ ) where you can also find information on travel and accommodation.

You can download the programme by clicking here.

We look forward to seeing you in Calgary!

 

Annie Rochette

President, Canadian Association of Law Teachers

 


CALT’s President’s message : A new year, a new mandate

Welcome to CALT’s new website!!!

We have been busy developing this new website for CALT members and Canadian law teachers. On this site you will find blog posts about legal and legal education topics, teaching and learning resources, postings for jobs and calls for papers, information about our journal and annual conference. But that’s only the start! The beauty of the site lies in its networking possibilities. With this website, we can manage our own communications to different audiences, we can create networks of members teaching in the same area or concerned about specific aspects of legal education, for example. The site is also connected to our Twitter and Facebook accounts, so if you follow us on those accounts, you’ll know of new posts. We can amend the website, add content, update the database without much outside help, which will help us reduce our costs.

 

New website, new smaller Executive board, new Constitution, new Advisory board, new award!

It is my great pleasure to be writing to you again this year in my capacity as the CALT president, re-elected at the June AGM in Ottawa for a term of two years.  John Kleefeld, from the University of Saskatchewan College of Law, was elected as the Vice-President.  Derek McKee agreed to stay on as our Treasurer for yet another year to ensure a successful transition to the new treasurer (any takers?). Angela Cameron (Ottawa) was elected as Secretary. We have also a small number of members at large: Teresa Scassa and Craig Forecese from the University of Ottawa and Konstantia Koutouki from Université de Montréal. Jennifer Koshan (Calgary) has agreed to be our local organizer for the annual conference 2016 which will be held in Calgary. Sara Ross is our graduate student representative. On behalf of CALT members, I extend a huge thank you to them for volunteering their time. You can see the members of the Executive here.

 

I would also like to thank the members of last year’s Executive: Shauna Van Praagh (past president, McGill), Gemma Smyth (Windsor), Amar Khoday (Manitoba), Eric Adams (Alberta), Elaine Craig (Dalhousie) and our two graduate student representatives, Vanisha Sukdeo (Osgoode) and Tenille Brown (Ottawa). Some of these members sat on the Executive for a few years, so a huge thank you for your service and dedication to CALT!

 

At our annual conference in Ottawa, the many members who were present (thank you!) adopted amendments to the CALT Constitution. Some of these changes reflect technological advances (for example communicating via email instead of snail mail(!), being able to consult our Executive via email), and some of them are more substantive. For instance, Executive members are now elected for a term of two years instead of one (although they must renew their membership every year) to ensure continuity and to be able to plan on a two-year basis. The amended Constitution has also created the possibility for an Advisory Board, with representatives at least from every law faculty in the country, chosen by their own institution. If any of you are interested in becoming an Advisory Board member, let us know! We will be putting it together very soon. The Advisory board may hold a couple of meetings per year, but its members will be consulted regularly on specific issues as they come up (mostly via email). They may also help out the Executive on ad hoc matters.

 

2016 CALT annual conference

The 2016 conference will be held in Calgary, May 30th-31st. Building on the Congress theme of “Energizing communities”, the theme for our conference is “Energizing communities through legal education”. We encourage each of you to submit a paper, workshop, panel or roundtable proposal. There are many current issues in law and legal education to discuss, and the CALT conference and policy committees and board are working to create some forums for these discussions. The success of this conference ultimately depends on your participation !  See the Call for papers here.

 

New Scholarship of teaching and learning award!

On the excellent suggestion of one of our members, we have also created a NEW award to be in line with CALT’s focus on legal education. This new prize will reward scholarship about teaching and learning in law, published or unpublished. You can find out more about this award in the “awards” tab!

 

2015-2016 plans

Our plans for the 2015-2016 year include the annual conference of course and the usual CALT activities (prizes, annual conference, journal). We are also exploring different options for CALT’s legal status and for membership. Considering the number of law professors in Canada, CALT’s membership base is still far from what it could be, or used to be. As I pointed out last year, our limited membership constitutes a limit as to the activities of CALT. We hope that the new website and the visibility that it creates will help boost membership. But from my conversations with law teachers in different forums, I have also observed that many people think they are automatically members of CALT, or that once they sign up, they are lifetime members of CALT. Wouldn’t that be nice!!! But that is actually not the case.  Every year, you have to renew your commitment to CALT by signing up and paying the modest fees of $75 ($25 for graduate students). With your membership, you get a free paper copy of the journal CLEAR (the Canadian Legal Education Annual Review) sent to you. 

Are you a member of CALT ?

Join here!

I look forward to exchanging ideas about what matters to legal educators in Canada with you throughout this year.

Annie Rochette

President, Canadian Association of Law Teachers



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