CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF LAW TEACHERS
L’ASSOCIATION CANADIENNE DES PROFESSEURS DE DROIT

CRC t2 Sherbrooke: "Vivre ensemble : cultures, pluralité, gouvernance et équité".

From Pr David Koussens, Vice-doyen à la recherche et aux relations internationales, Titulaire de la Chaire de recherche Droit, religion et laïcitéFaculté de Droit

Chères collègues, chers collègues,

Dans le cadre de l'appel de propositions lié au Programme de chaires de recherche du Canada (CRC), la Faculté de droit de l'Université de Sherbrooke (UdeS) sollicite des candidatures afin de pourvoir à un poste de professeure ou professeur pour une CRC de niveau 2.

La proposition de CRC devra s'inscrire dans le thème fédérateur "Vivre ensemble : cultures, pluralité, gouvernance et équité". (LIVING IN SOCIETY: CULTURE, PLURALITY, GOVERNANCE AND EQUITY)

Voir l'offre d'emploi ci-dessous. La date limite pour soumettre sa candidature est le VENDREDI 30 AOÛT 2024, À 17 h.

https://www.usherbrooke.ca/emplois/offre/no/07063(francais)

English follows: 

 


AGA/AGM

Add to your calendar/Ajouter à votre calendrier

AVIS OFFICIEL DE L'ASSEMBLÉE GÉNÉRALE ANNUELLE/ OFFICIAL NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 

VEUILLEZ NOTER QUE l'Assemblée Générale Annuelle de l'Association canadienne des professeur(e)s de droit aura lieu le / TAKE NOTICE that the Annual General Meeting of Canadian Association of Law Teachers will be held on  

Jeudi le 30 mai 2024, à 12 :45 ADT    /   Thursday May 30 2024 at 12:45ADT 

University of New Brunswick Faculty of Law 

 OR/OU 

via Zoom Internet Meetings (register/s'inscrire)  

You must register in advance for this meeting to  receive a zoom link via email.   

Merci de vous inscrire à l'avance.  Vous recevez ensuite un e-mail avec un lien “zoom”. 

11:45 am EDT  10:45 am CDT   9:45 am MDT   8:45 am PDT 

 

 


Conference Program

May 19.2024 Now Final

Download here.

 


Job Opportunity: Graduate School of International Studies at Laval University

The Graduate School of International Studies at Laval University is seeking a PROFESSOR IN GLOBALIZATION ISSUES

english ad here  

en francais ici

The Graduate School of International Studies at Laval University (Quebec City, Canada)

is currently seeking a professor working in a multidisciplinary approach on globalization

issues. Multilateral governance of trade; regional economic integration partnerships;

combating inequalities on an international scale; links between trade and development;

reconciling freedom of trade with environmental, health, social, and cultural issues;

development and implementation of national trade policies; combating climate change and

policies for adapting to these changes; challenges related to agricultural trade; phenomena

of protectionism, precautionism, and friend-shoring; inclusive and sustainable trade; ecommerce

and cybercrime; and more generally, green, digital, and security shifts that

today’s global economy is undergoing are examples of themes that the Graduate School is

interested in.


Allard UBC 2024-2025 Global South Visiting Scholar In-Residence Deadline: May 31, 2024

See the full posting here.

"The successful Global South Visiting Scholar (GSVS) will spend a minimum of two weeks and maximum of three months in residence at the Peter A. Allard School of Law. For this iteration of the program, the GSVS must be able to complete this opportunity either between September-November 2024, or during the 2025 calendar year. In order to facilitate active participation in the Law School community, the GSVS must arrange to be in residence during Allard’s academic year, namely September-November 2024, January-March 2025, or September-November 2025. Preference may be given to candidates who are able to attend during the September-November 2024 or January-March 2025 terms. As part of their visit, the GSVS is expected to give lectures, hold sessions with faculty and graduate students, and conduct independent research. The ideal candidate will be an early to mid-career scholar."


Final Report and Recommendations National Requirement Review accepted by the Council of the Federation

The Final Report was released recently (here in English, here in French) and changes to the National Requirement have already been approved by the Council of the Federation.  The final Report does not differ significantly from the early drafts.  CALT's comments to the NRRC throughout this review process can be found here

We are looking forward to further discussion with members and others on the changes, implications, process and in particular perhaps the suggestion of a Forum on Continuum of Legal Education  which is apparently being discussed between the Federation and the Canadian Council of Law Deans (see para 112 et seq of the Report). 

 


Info Conference 2024

MAGNIFICENT OBSESSIONS MERVEILLEUSES OBSESSIONS UNB 2024

Accommodation, Transportation, Dining, Attractions || Hébergement, transport, restauration, attractions

Registration is OPEN NOW (click here to register)

Programme UNB 2024

L'inscription est OUVERTE MAINTENANT (cliquez ici pour vous inscrire)

We encourage attendees to book flights and accommodation early!  Nous encourageons les participants à réserver leur vol et leur hébergement à l'avance !

 

Researching, Teaching and Learning Together Wednesday May 29 - Friday May 31, 2024 / Faculty of Law, University of New Brunswick 

Faire de la recherche, enseigner et apprendre ensemble Mercredi 29 mai — vendredi 31 mai 2024  Faculté de droit, Université du Nouveau-Brunswick

Fredericton, New Brunswick / Nouveau-Brunswick

la version française suit

ACCOMMODATION

We have secured preferential rates at two hotels in Downtown Fredericton, the Crowne Plaza (10 rooms) and the Hilton Garden Inn (65 rooms). These hotels are across the street from each other and are about a  20 minute walk (uphill) to the conference venue (the Law School). The special rates are $168+tx/night. Please note that the cut-off date for group reservations is May 1, 2024 and rooms may book up before that time. 

Here are the links for the group bookings:

Crowne Plaza (Lord Beaverbrook) Pet friendly, pool.  Book via www.rebrand.ly/CALT2024     

Hilton Garden Inn Fredericton Pet friendly (fee).   You can reserve by calling the Front Desk directly at 1-506-999-1551 (press 0) and noting you are booking under the “CALT 2024” room block to secure the group rate. Alternatively, book through the hotel website using www.rebrand.ly/CALT-2024-    

Stay on Campus

University Residence rooms may be available for booking later in the Winter.  See here.  You can contact the Summer Accommodations Team at [email protected] 

Other Options

Another well-reviewed hotel in Downtown Fredericton is the Delta Fredericton.  Near the University/downtown there are some smaller inns/B&Bs (Carriage HouseThe Red House).  Other chain  hotels including the Wyndham Fredericton (pet friendly, pool and waterslide) can be found in what is called “uptown” Fredericton (further from downtown and the University).  

TRANSPORTATION

Taxi Services (there is no Uber or other ride share available)

ABC Car Service*                    (506) 454-5466                  

Tri County Taxi                     (506) 450-8888                 

Checker Cab                          (506) 450-8294   

Public Transportation

https://www.fredericton.ca/en/resident-services/fredericton-transit

A transit schedule is available here.  The Fredericton Transit route that serves both Downtown and UNB is the 16N-17S Marysville. 

DINING

Our conference takes place on campus and there are limited eateries.  We are providing light snacks, coffee and lunch.  Vegetarian options will be available.  There are many places to eat in Fredericton catering for a wide variety of tastes, budgets and dietary needs.  See here for some options.

ATTRACTIONS

Find out more about things to do in  Fredericton & New Brunswick

As usual, our conference will include plenary sessions, awards, keynote speakers, parallel sessions, a conference dinner, a social event or two exploring Fredericton, and ACPD-CALT’s annual general meeting. 

We encourage attendees to book flights and accommodation early. 

All presenters must be members of ACPD-CALT by May 1 2024.  You can become a member hereThe requirement of membership does not include people who are neither law teachers nor graduate students, for instance, community members who may be participating in your proposal. Please contact us directly in that case at [email protected] or indicate that people in this position are a part of your proposal.

Nous encourageons les participants à réserver leurs billets d'avion et leur hébergement dès le début de la conférence. 
 

HÉBERGEMENT

Nous avons obtenu des tarifs préférentiels dans deux hôtels du centre-ville de Fredericton, le Crowne Plaza (10 chambres) et le Hilton Garden Inn (65 chambres). Ces hôtels sont situés en face l'un de l'autre et à environ 20 minutes de marche (en montant) du lieu de la conférence (la faculté de droit). Les tarifs spéciaux sont de 168$+tx/nuit. Veuillez noter que la date limite pour les réservations de groupe est le 1er mai 2024 et que les chambres peuvent être réservées avant cette date. 
 
Voici les liens pour les réservations de groupe :
 

Crowne Plaza (Lord Beaverbrook)

Animaux acceptés, piscine.  Réservez via www.rebrand.ly/CALT2024     

Hilton Garden Inn Fredericton

Accepte les animaux domestiques (payant).   Vous pouvez réserver en appelant directement la réception au 1-506-999-1551 (appuyez sur 0) et en indiquant que vous réservez dans le cadre du bloc de chambres "CALT 2024" pour obtenir le tarif de groupe. Vous pouvez également réserver sur le site web de l'hôtel à l'adresse www.rebrand.ly/CALT-2024-.    

Séjourner sur le campus

 
Des chambres en résidence universitaire pourront être réservées plus tard au cours de l'hiver.  Voir ici.  Vous pouvez contacter l'équipe chargée de l'hébergement d'été à l'adresse [email protected]
 

AUTRES OPTIONS

 
Le Delta Fredericton est un autre hôtel bien coté au centre-ville de Fredericton.  Près de l'université et du centre-ville, il y a quelques petites auberges et chambres d'hôtes (Carriage House, The Red House).  D'autres chaînes hôtelières, dont le Wyndham Fredericton (acceptant les animaux, piscine et toboggan aquatique), se trouvent dans ce que l'on appelle le "haut du centre-ville" de Fredericton (plus loin de l'université). 

TRANSPORT

Services de taxi (il n'y a pas d'Uber ou d'autres services de covoiturage disponibles)
 
ABC Car Service* (506) 454-5466                  
 
Tri County Taxi (506) 450-8888                 
 
Checker Cab (506) 450-8294  
 

TRANSPORTS PUBLICS

 
https://www.fredericton.ca/en/resident-services/fredericton-transit
 
L'horaire des transports en commun est disponible ici.  La ligne de transport en commun de Fredericton qui dessert le centre-ville et l'UNB est la 16N-17S Marysville. 
 

Restauration

Notre conférence se déroule sur le campus et il y a peu de restaurants.  Nous fournissons des collations légères, du café et le déjeuner.  Des options végétariennes seront disponibles.  Il y a de nombreux endroits où manger à Fredericton, pour une grande variété de goûts, de budgets et de régimes alimentaires.  Voir ici pour quelques options.
 

Attractions

Pour en savoir plus sur les choses à faire à Fredericton et au Nouveau-Brunswick. 
 
 
 
Comme d'habitude, notre conférence comprendra des séances plénières, des prix, des conférenciers principaux, des séances parallèles, un dîner de conférence, un ou deux événements sociaux à Fredericton et l'assemblée générale annuelle d'ACPD-CALT. 
 
Nous encourageons les participants à réserver leur vol et leur hébergement à l'avance. 
 
Tous les présentateurs doivent être membres d'ACPD-CALT avant le 1er mai 2024.  Vous pouvez devenir membre ici. L'obligation d'adhésion ne s'applique pas aux personnes qui ne sont ni professeurs de droit ni étudiants diplômés, par exemple les membres de la communauté qui pourraient participer à votre projet. Dans ce cas, veuillez nous contacter directement à l'adresse suivante : contact@acpd-calt.

CALL FOR PAPERS Colloque annuel 2024 Annual Conference

MAGNIFICENT OBSESSIONS / 

MERVEILLEUSES OBSESSIONS

Researching, Teaching and Learning Together /

Faire de la recherche, enseigner et apprendre ensemble

Wednesday May 29 - Friday May 31, 2024 / 

Mercredi 29 mai — vendredi 31 mai 2024 

Faculty of Law, University of New Brunswick 

Faculté de droit, Université du Nouveau-Brunswick

Fredericton, New Brunswick / Nouveau-Brunswick

Deadline for proposals:  Tuesday December 19, 2023

Date limite pour soumettre une proposition : le mardi 19 décembre 2023

Appel de propositions (fr) .pdf

ACPD-CALT is delighted to invite members of the community of Law Teachers to our annual conference, May 29-31, 2024 in Fredericton, New Brunswick, hosted by the Faculty of Law, University of New Brunswick.  UNB sits on a river known as Wolastoq along which live Wolastoqiyik – the people of the beautiful and bountiful river. Wolastoq is also called the St. John River.  The Faculty and UNB stand on the unsurrendered and unceded traditional Wolastoqey land.  The lands of Wabanaki people are recognized in a series of Peace and Friendship Treaties to establish an ongoing relationship of peace, friendship and mutual respect between equal nations.  

 

At this Conference, we aim to develop and deepen our understanding of the relationships between our roles as researchers, teachers (including clinical legal educators), and practitioners.  We want to ask critical questions - who is our community?  What are the politics which shape the spaces we work in and the ideas we work with?  We want to ask about relationships between law schools and law teachers and others. 

 

At the same time, our theme, “Magnificent Obsessions” is intended to be playful.  We hope to make space at this conference for joy: the joy of being together; the joy of developing ideas through research; and the joy of sharing these ideas with our students, with each other, and with the broader community.

 

In keeping with our theme, ACPD-CALT is making space at this event for discussions about learning, teaching, research, and the connections amongst them. We invite participants to submit proposals on any of the above areas across a range of themes, ideas, or subject areas. In particular, we wish to encourage participants to submit proposals for sessions that draw connections amongst learning, research, and teaching.  Below you will find three slightly different elaborations on our theme. You will also see that we are inviting proposals for papers, panels, workshops and roundtable discussions. These different formats are explained below. 

 

As usual, our conference will include plenary sessions, awards, keynote speakers, parallel sessions, a conference dinner, a social event or two exploring Fredericton, and ACPD-CALT’s annual general meeting. 

 

Information about registration, fees, accommodation options and more specific timings will be available in early 2024. We encourage attendees to book flights and accommodation early. 

 

The ACPD-CALT Conference Committee is grateful to our local organizers Professor Nicole O’Byrne (University of New Brunswick) and Professor Adrien Habermacher (Université de Moncton), who have welcomed us to the East Coast. Thanks are also due to Dean Michael Marin of the University of New Brunswick Faculty of Law, who has enthusiastically supported this conference, and the event staff at the Faculty who are being very helpful with planning and logistics. 

 

Languages and Translation

We expect to have simultaneous translation for a small number of sessions.  

All sessions can be held in either English or in French.  Mixed language sessions are also welcome.  

Virtual Stream

We hope that many of you will be able to join us in-person.  However, we understand that conferences are not accessible to all. We are planning for a small number of remote (only) sessions to make the conference more accessible. We are also hoping to stream one or more plenary sessions.  Remote access to in-person sessions will not generally be available at this Conference. 

Have an idea, but worried it isn’t quite ready? Talk to us!

Reach out!  The ACPD-CALT Executive would be happy to talk to you about panel, roundtable, and workshop ideas that aren’t quite finished.  We will work with you to develop the idea and identify possible participants.  Or, we can publish open invitations to join roundtables in our newsletter. We’d be delighted to work through your thoughts with you. Email us at [email protected]

Graduate Students

ACPD-CALT will host a graduate student roundtable at which graduate students will be invited to present their work and to share ideas and engage in discussion about teaching.  More information will follow.  Graduate students can be members of CALT and are invited to join proposals and develop their own. 

Childcare

While ACPT-CALT will not provide childcare during the conference, children (including infants) are welcome to accompany presenters and participants, and to share in the conference food and drink at no cost. As well, we will ensure that at least some of the suggested and planned activities will be suitable for families and children. We will also ensure that our list of recommended accommodation options includes accommodation that is suitable for participants traveling with children. Limited funding will be available to assist with costs related to child care, including to assist with the cost of caregivers accompanying participants with children. Further details will be available in early 2024.  

Proposals: Themes & Formats

We are interested in proposals for complete (all participants are already confirmed) or partial (with space for more participants) sessions of 1.5hrs.  We have set out three formats and three subthemes below.  We encourage you to reach out to colleagues at different institutions and career stages to generate possibilities and build a community of practice which can come together at Magnificent Obsessions.  

 

THREE SUBSTANTIVE SUBTHEMES

THEME I: The Political Economy of Research Teaching and Learning 

We invite sessions which reflect on the role of the academic, contextualized in the political economy of the legal academy.  This is intended as an invitation to deliberately and specifically look at the politics of our work and to perhaps connect it to the politics of our times.  This stream holds work which situates the Canadian legal academy within larger frames of public policy. It includes explorations of the moralities, ethics, orientations and goals which either do, or should, guide researcher-teachers in their work within the legal academy.  

 

We hope through this theme to engage in discussions that address the many ways in which the contemporary Canadian legal academy is quite different than it was even just a few years ago.  How can we conceptualize the deep changes which mark our work as researchers and teachers but seem to have happened seamlessly without a moment of rupture?  Explorations could consider this topic in terms of changes since the 1983 Arthurs Report (“Law and Learning”), the end of regulated tuition in particular provinces, the development of teaching clinics and the roles that they play in different institutions and communities, the shifting demographics of our students and our faculty colleagues, changing professional norms and forms, the development of the Federation of Canadian Law Societies National Requirement, or the impact of the global pandemic since 2020, among many other potential areas of exploration and interest.  

THEME II:  Research as Learning: Formalizing our Curiosity

We invite sessions which focus on the presenter’s research work in any “legal” field, including how research work produces and disseminates knowledge. Within this subtheme we also welcome proposals that engage with research conducted in community in connection with clinics, research on social change connected to clinics, and research in or about clinics. 

 

In addition to thinking about the results of research, we are interested in conceptualizing research as a form of learning.   What are our methods for learning about our “magnificent obsessions”?  How does this structure or affect our relationship with others connected to research? How does it confine or expand our understanding of what it is we are doing when we research? How do various kinds of research change our vision of the world? What motivates us to engage in research, including within legal clinics? What is the value of research? 

 

We hope through this theme to attract groups who may be interested in focusing on a particular subject area across a panel, a roundtable or a workshop - or perhaps all three. In the more distant past ACPD-CALT was a major space for presenting all manner of legal research conducted by Canadian legal academics. The organization included many "sections" based on areas of research and each would have a series of panels at the yearly conference. As the academy and the academic space changed, we now have access to a wider range of spaces, whether very general or extremely specialized, in which to present our research.  We are able to travel further (sometimes just by turning on a screen) to present to and listen to people working on similar questions. These are important and positive shifts. But we still believe that coming together across career stages and schools, but within a particular area of study, is a valuable activity that ignites further research and insight, and that ACPD-CALT has a role to play in fostering spaces in which these discussions can occur.

THEME III:  Teaching as Learning/Learning to Teach

We invite sessions that engage with teaching, and that provide participants with opportunities to engage with research related to teaching. This stream encompasses all research into legal learning at any level and in all settings, including professional, graduate, public, undergraduate, and clinical legal education.  

 

We hope through this theme to attract groups interested in a range of different teaching-related sessions. Topics might include the efficacy of certain teaching modalities and modes, including clinical teaching and teaching via land-based education.  Other topics could consider experiments in teaching, empirical research into challenges or opportunities in teaching, evaluation, digital technologies and teaching/learning, the challenges and opportunities in learning from doing, and the significance and discourse about different modalities and modes of teaching. 

FORMATS: Workshops, Roundtables, Panels 

 

Workshops: 1-4 people present a session intended to allow participants to engage in interactive ways. The proposal should provide a clear indication of what the participants will do during and learn from the session. 

 

Roundtables: Normally no more than 10 people provide brief reflections on a set topic which may include a set text or series of texts to ground the reflections. These may be research or teaching focused.  They might be “Author-Meets-Reader” sessions. In arranging these sessions we encourage our colleagues to ensure that some space is available for newer (pre-tenure) entrants to law teaching. Roundtables can be in person, or online, in English, or in French. 

 

Panels: 3 or 4 related papers are presented sequentially. We encourage the submission of complete panel proposals from researchers working on similar themes or topics. We will, however, accept single paper proposals and attempt to find the right space for them in our program. Panels can be in person or online, in English, or in French.

 

Participants who are not proposing fully constituted panels but submitting a single proposal which would fit on a panel will be asked on the Proposal Form to indicate four different descriptors of their work:

 

  • The methodology used in the research (multiple answers allowed) 
  • The subject area of the research (multiple answers allowed) 
    • The type of law school class or clinic in which this research could contribute to teaching (you may indicate more than one substantive area or course). 
    • Whether the work best fits with theme I, II or III.

     

    SUBMISSION OF PROPOSALS

    All Proposals, on all themes and in all formats,  must be submitted at this link by December 19, 2023:   https://forms.gle/XFTm3aPUhjfoY4VU6 

     

    All presenters must be members of ACPD-CALT by May 1 2024.  You can become a member hereThe requirement of membership does not include people who are neither law teachers nor graduate students, for instance, community members who may be participating in your proposal. Please contact us directly in that case at [email protected] or indicate that people in this position are a part of your proposal.

     

    ACPD-CALT 2024 Conference Committee

    Graham Reynolds, Chair

    Richard Devlin 

    Sonia Lawrence 

    Anna Lund 

    Sarah-jane Nussbaum 

    David Wiseman

    Local Organizers: 

    Nicole O’Byrne (University of New Brunswick) 

    Adrien Habermacher (Université de Moncton)

 

 

C’est avec beaucoup d’enthousiasme que l’ACPD-CALT invite les membres du corps professoral en droit à son colloque annuel, qui se tiendra du 29 au 31 mai 2024 à Fredericton, au Nouveau-Brunswick, en collaboration avec la Faculté de droit de l’Université du Nouveau-Brunswick. L’UNB est située sur une rivière connue sous le nom de Wolastoq, le long de laquelle vivent les Wolastoqiyik, le peuple de la belle et généreuse rivière. Wolastoq est également appelé le fleuve Saint-Jean. La Faculté et l’UNB se trouvent sur les terres ancestrales non cédées des Wolastoqey. Les terres des Abénaquis sont reconnues dans une série de traités de paix et d’amitié visant à établir une relation permanente de paix, d’amitié et de respect mutuel entre des nations égales.

 

Lors du colloque, nous souhaitons mieux comprendre les relations qui existent entre nos différents rôles : chercheuses et chercheurs, professeures et professeurs (incluant les responsables de la formation juridique clinique), praticiennes et praticiens. Nous voulons poser des questions importantes : qui compose notre communauté ? Quelle est la dimension politique qui façonne les lieux où nous travaillons et les idées que nous utilisons ? Nous voulons nous questionner sur les relations entre les facultés de droit, les membres du corps professoral en droit et d’autres personnes.

 

Notre thème, « Merveilleuses obsessions », se veut aussi ludique. Nous espérons qu’il y aura de la joie lors de ce colloque : la joie d’être ensemble ; la joie d’élaborer des idées tirées de la recherche ; et la joie de partager ces idées avec nos étudiantes et étudiants, entre nous et avec l’ensemble de la communauté.

 

Fidèle au thème du colloque, l’ACPD-CALT prévoit des moments pour discuter de l’apprentissage, de l’enseignement, de la recherche et des liens qui unissent chacune de ces activités. Nous invitons les personnes participantes à nous soumettre des propositions sur l’un ou l’autre des domaines ci-dessous, chacun relié à un éventail de thématiques, d’idées ou de sujets. Nous encourageons plus spécifiquement les personnes participantes à nous proposer des séances qui font des liens entre l’apprentissage, la recherche et l’enseignement. Vous trouverez plus bas trois perspectives légèrement différentes liées au thème du colloque. Vous verrez aussi que nous sollicitons des propositions de différents types (communications, panels, ateliers et tables rondes) pour lesquels vous trouverez une description ci-dessous. 

 

Comme d’habitude, notre colloque inclura des séances plénières, des remises de prix, des conférences principales, des séances simultanées, un banquet, une ou deux activités sociales pour découvrir Fredericton et l’assemblée générale annuelle de l’Association. 

 

L’information concernant les inscriptions, les frais, les possibilités d’hébergement et les horaires sera disponible au début de 2024. Nous incitons les personnes qui participeront au colloque à réserver rapidement leurs vols et leur hébergement.

 

Le comité d’organisation du colloque de l’ACPD-CALT tient à remercier les personnes qui se chargeront de l’organisation locale : la professeure Nicole O’Byrne (Université du Nouveau-Brunswick) et le professeur Adrien Habermacher (Université de Moncton), qui nous ont invités sur la côte est. Nous désirons aussi remercier Michael Marin, doyen de la Faculté de droit de l’Université du Nouveau-Brunswick, qui appuie avec enthousiasme notre colloque, et le personnel de sa Faculté affecté à la planification et à la logistique de notre événement.



Langues et traduction

Nous prévoyons offrir la traduction simultanée pour un petit nombre de séances.

Toutes les séances peuvent se tenir en anglais ou en français. Les séances dans les deux langues sont aussi les bienvenues. 

Volet virtuel

Nous espérons que plusieurs d’entre vous seront avec nous en personne. Toutefois, nous savons que la participation à des colloques n’est pas possible pour toutes et pour tous. Nous sommes en train de planifier la tenue de quelques séances à distance (seulement) pour rendre le colloque plus accessible. Nous souhaitons aussi diffuser en continu au moins une séance plénière, peut-être plus. L’accès à distance pour les séances en personne sera généralement possible lors du colloque.

Vous avez une idée, mais vous ne savez pas si elle est assez bien définie. Contactez-nous pour en parler !

 

Contactez-nous ! Le comité exécutif de l’ACPD-CALT sera heureux de discuter avec vous d’idées de panels, de tables rondes et d’ateliers qui vous semblent encore mal définies. Nous travaillerons avec vous pour élaborer des séances et identifier des conférencières et conférenciers potentiels. Nous pouvons aussi publier des invitations à participer à une table ronde dans notre bulletin. Nous serons ravis de développer vos idées avec vous. Contactez-nous par courriel à : [email protected].

Étudiantes et étudiants aux cycles supérieurs

L’ACPD-CALT organisera une table ronde pour les étudiantes et étudiants des 2e et 3e cycles, pendant laquelle ils pourront présenter leurs travaux, partager leurs idées et discuter d’enseignement. Plus d’information suivra à ce sujet. Les personnes étudiant à la maîtrise ou au doctorat peuvent adhérer à l’ACPD, prendre part à des propositions et soumettre leurs propres propositions.

Service de garde

Bien que l’ACPD-CALT ne fournira pas de service de garde pendant le colloque, les enfants (incluant les bébés) sont les bienvenus et peuvent accompagner les personnes présentatrices et participantes. Ils peuvent aussi boire et manger gratuitement ce qui sera servi lors du colloque. De plus, nous allons nous assurer qu’au moins quelques activités soient intéressantes pour les familles et les enfants et que les propositions d’hébergement conviennent aux personnes participantes qui voyagent avec des enfants. Des fonds limités seront disponibles pour aider à couvrir les frais de garde, incluant les frais d’une personne aidante accompagnant une personne participante avec des enfants. Plus de détails seront fournis au début de 2024.

Propositions : thèmes et types d’activités

Nous sollicitons des propositions pour des séances clés en main (toutes les personnes participantes ont été trouvées) ou en développement (avec la possibilité d’ajouter des personnes participantes) d’une durée d’une heure et demie. Nous avons choisi les trois types d’activités et les trois thèmes ci-dessous. Nous vous encourageons à communiquer avec vos collègues à d’autres établissements et à différentes étapes de leur carrière pour partager des idées et ainsi créer une communauté de pratique qui se rassemblera au colloque Merveilleuses obsessions.

TROIS THÈMES DIRECTEURS

I : L’économie politique de la recherche, de l’enseignement et de l’apprentissage

Nous aimerions recevoir des propositions de séances qui se penchent sur le rôle du monde universitaire, contextualisé dans l’économie politique du monde juridique universitaire. Il s’agit d’une invitation qui vise délibérément et spécifiquement à examiner l’aspect politique de notre travail afin de le relier à la politique de notre époque. Ce volet présentera des travaux qui situent le monde juridique universitaire au Canada dans le cadre plus large des politiques publiques. Il inclut l’exploration de la moralité publique, de l’éthique, des orientations et des buts qui guident, ou qui devraient guider, les professeurs-chercheurs dans leur travail au sein des facultés de droit.

 

Nous espérons dans le cadre de ce thème discuter en quoi le monde juridique universitaire au Canada est différent de ce qu’il était il y a quelques années seulement. Comment peut-on conceptualiser les changements profonds qui affectent notre recherche et notre enseignement, mais qui semblent s’être produits doucement, sans période de rupture ? Les présentations pourraient analyser, parmi une foule d’autres sujets possibles, les problématiques suivantes : les changements survenus depuis le rapport Arthurs de 1983 (Le droit et le savoir), la fin de la réglementation des droits de scolarité dans certaines provinces, le développement des cliniques de formation et le rôle qu’elles jouent dans différentes institutions et communautés, l’évolution démographiques de nos étudiantes et étudiants ainsi que de nos collègues du corps professoral, les changements aux normes et aux formes professionnelles, la mise en place de l’Exigence nationale par la Fédération des ordres professionnels de juristes du Canada ou l’impact de la pandémie depuis 2020.

 

II : La recherche pour apprendre : structurer notre curiosité

Nous aimerions offrir des séances pendant lesquelles des conférencières et des conférenciers présenteront la recherche qu’ils effectuent, quel que soit le domaine « juridique », la façon dont ce travail de recherche génère du savoir et comment ce dernier est diffusé. Dans le cadre de ce sous-thème, nous aimerions aussi recevoir des propositions qui portent sur la recherche réalisée dans la communauté, en lien avec les cliniques, la recherche sur les changements sociaux liés à ces cliniques et la recherche dans les cliniques ou sur celles-ci.

 

En plus de notre intérêt pour la question des résultats de recherche, nous nous intéressons à la conceptualisation de la recherche en tant que forme d’apprentissage. Quelles sont nos méthodes pour comprendre nos « merveilleuses obsessions » ? Comment cela structure-t-il ou affecte-t-il notre relation avec les autres dans le cadre de la recherche ? Comment cela définit-il ou élargit-il notre compréhension de ce que nous faisons lorsque nous faisons de la recherche ? Comment les différents types de recherche changent-ils notre vision du monde ? Qu’est-ce qui nous motive à faire de la recherche et à nous investir dans la recherche au sein de cliniques ? Quelle est l’importance de la recherche ?

 

Avec ce thème, nous souhaitons attirer les groupes qui souhaitent se concentrer sur une thématique particulière lors d’un panel, d’une table ronde ou d’un atelier (ou peut-être les trois). Il y a un certain temps, l’ACPD-CALT était un lieu important pour présenter différents types de recherche dans le domaine juridique, réalisés par le corps professoral des facultés de droit canadiennes. L’Association avait alors plusieurs « sections » axées sur des thématiques de recherche et elle offrait une série de panels sur ces thématiques lors de son colloque annuel. Le milieu universitaire a changé et nous avons maintenant accès à un éventail de lieux, de nature très générale ou extrêmement spécialisée, où présenter notre recherche. Nous sommes capables de voyager davantage (parfois seulement en nous tournant vers notre écran) pour présenter et écouter des gens qui travaillent sur des questions similaires. Il s’agit de changements importants et positifs. Cependant, nous croyons quand même qu’il est bénéfique de favoriser la rencontre, autour d’un domaine d’étude spécifique, de personnes étant à différentes étapes de leur carrière et travaillant dans différents établissements d’enseignement. L’ACPD-CALT a un rôle à jouer pour favoriser de telles activités qui stimulent la recherche et le développement de nouvelles idées. 

III : Enseigner tout en apprenant/Apprendre pour enseigner

Nous aimerions recevoir des propositions de séances qui s’intéressent à l’enseignement et qui offrent aux personnes participantes des occasions de réfléchir à la recherche sur l’enseignement. Ce volet concerne toute la recherche qui porte sur l’apprentissage dans le domaine juridique, à tous les niveaux et dans tous les milieux, incluant le milieu professionnel, le 1er cycle, les études supérieures, la population et la formation clinique.

 

Nous voulons, avec ce thème, rejoindre les groupes intéressés à participer à différentes séances autour de l’enseignement. Les thématiques pourraient être l’efficacité de certaines modalités et modes d’enseignement, incluant l’enseignement clinique et l’enseignement dans la communauté. Voici quelques sujets qui cadreraient bien dans ce thème : des expériences d’enseignement, la recherche empirique sur les défis et les possibilités dans l’enseignement, l’évaluation, les technologies numériques pour l’enseignement et la recherche, les enjeux et les avantages d’apprendre par l’action ainsi que le discours, et sa portée, sur les modalités et modes d’enseignement.

TYPES D’ACTIVITÉS : Ateliers, tables rondes et panels

 

Ateliers : Activité présentée par une à quatre  personnes pendant laquelle les personnes participantes auront l’occasion d’interagir de façons variées. La proposition doit indiquer clairement ce que les personnes participantes feront et apprendront pendant l’activité.

 

Tables rondes : Activité regroupant habituellement un maximum de 10 personnes présentant une brève réflexion sur un sujet donné. Un ou plusieurs textes pourraient être utilisés comme point de départ de la réflexion. Les tables rondes peuvent porter sur la recherche ou l’enseignement. Il peut s’agir de rencontres entre autrices/auteurs et lectrices/lecteurs. Pour l’organisation d’une telle activité, nous encourageons nos collègues à s’assurer que l’activité sera d’intérêt pour les personnes arrivées depuis peu dans notre milieu et qui n’ont pas encore la permanence. Les tables rondes peuvent se tenir en personne ou en ligne, en anglais ou en français.

 

Panels : Activité pendant laquelle trois ou quatre communications sont présentées, une après l’autre. Nous aimerions recevoir des propositions pour lesquelles toutes les personnes intervenantes ont été choisies, venant de chercheuses et chercheurs travaillant sur des thématiques semblables. Nous accepterons aussi des propositions de communications libres, en espérant réussir à les inclure dans le programme. 

 

Les personnes participantes qui ne proposeront pas des panels clés en main, mais qui déposeront une proposition de communication libre à intégrer à un panel, devront indiquer dans le formulaire de proposition les quatre éléments suivants :

 

  • la méthodologie utilisée dans le cadre de la recherche (plusieurs réponses possibles);
  • le domaine thématique de la recherche (plusieurs réponses possibles);
  • le type de cours de droit ou de clinique visé par cette recherche et comment celle-ci pourrait contribuer à l’enseignement;
  • le thème (I, II III) qui conviendrait le mieux à cette recherche. 

 

DÉPÔT DES PROPOSITIONS

 

Toutes les propositions, quels que soient le thème et le type d’activité, doivent être déposées électroniquement à cette adresse au plus tard le 19 décembre 2023.

https://forms.gle/XFTm3aPUhjfoY4VU6

 

Toutes les personnes qui feront une présentation doivent être membres de l’ACPD-CALT au plus tard le 1er mai 2024. Vous pouvez adhérer en cliquant ici. Toutefois, les personnes qui ne sont pas des professeurs de droit ou des étudiantes et étudiants aux cycles supérieurs, telles que des membres de la communauté qui pourraient prendre part à votre proposition, ne sont pas tenues d’adhérer à l’Association. Dans de tels cas, veuillez nous contacter directement à [email protected] ou l’indiquer dans votre proposition.



Comité d’organisation du colloque 2024 de l’ACPD-CALT

Graham Reynolds, président

Richard Devlin 

Sonia Lawrence 

Anna Lund 

Sarah-jane Nussbaum 

David Wiseman

Organisation locale

Nicole O’Byrne (Université du Nouveau-Brunswick) 

Adrien Habermacher (Université de Moncton)


2024 Conference Roundtable Invitations

More information about Conference 2024 at UNB
   
We’ve received a number of outstanding proposals for panels, workshops, and roundtables for this year’s ACPD-CALT conference in Fredericton!
Some of these roundtables are keen to invite additional participants. Could this be you?
Please see the list at left, and longer descriptions here or below, of roundtables seeking members.
If you are interested in contributing to any of these roundtables, please contact the contact person listed under the roundtable description below.  Space may be limited.
Looking forward to seeing many of you in Fredericton in May! 
Graham Reynolds Associate Professor and Associate Dean,Research & International) Allard School of Law UBC on behalf of the Conference Organizing Committee

Roundtables still interested in participants

  • The State of Scholarly Publishing in Canadian Law School Journals Tenille Brown (Lakehead)
  • The Law Professor in a Troubled Democracy
    Shaun Fluker (Calgary)
  • Experiments in Teaching in a World of Generative AI - Audrey Fried (Osgoode OPD)
  • Legal Issues in Housing and Homelessness- Anna Lund (Alberta), Sarah Buhler (Saskatchewan), Estair Van Wagner (Osgoode)
  • IP and tech law teaching and pedagogy - Graham Reynolds (Allard UBC)
  • Co-Teaching in Law Schools - David Sandomierski (Western)
  • Teaching Race and Contract Law: Confronting, Countering and Reconstituting Legal Narratives - Constance MacIntosh, Melisa Marsman, Suzie Dunn (Dalhousie)
  • Shifting Demographics of Faculty and Students in Canadian Law Schools - Eliza Xue (UNB)
   

MAGNIFICENT OBSESSIONS

Researching, Teaching and Learning Together Wednesday May 29 - Friday May 31, 2024 / Faculty of Law, University of New Brunswick 

Call for papers (eng) .pdf (Closed)

MERVEILLEUSES OBSESSIONS

Faire de la recherche, enseigner et apprendre ensemble Mercredi 29 mai — vendredi 31 mai 2024  Faculté de droit, Université du Nouveau-Brunswick

Appel de Propositions .PDF (Closed)

View of UNB from the River

ACPD-CALT ROUNDTABLES

The State of Scholarly Publishing in Canadian Law School Journals Tenille Brown (Lakehead)

This is a call for Editor-in-Chiefs, Faculty Advisors, and Faculty involved in the running of law journals housed at Canadian law schools to participate in a roundtable on the state of scholarly publishing in Canadian law journals. This roundtable is an opportunity to discuss all aspects of academic publishing, including topics such as: journal work post-Covid, pedagogy through journals, reach and impact, the challenge of peer review, and to reflect generally on challenges and successes of journals housed at Canadian law schools. The roundtable will be preceded by a panel representing four Canadian journals. It is our hope that a roundtable discussion will be an opportunity for us to share our knowledge, experience, and goals on all things related to scholarly publishing in Canadian law school journals. If you would like to contribute to the roundtable or have any questions, please reach out to Tenille E. Brown, Editor-in-Chief of the Lakehead Law Journal. Email: [email protected]

The Law Professor in a Troubled Democracy - Shaun Fluker (Calgary)

We are in extraordinary socio-political times: the rise of populism in electoral politics, an executive branch willing to use its power to openly attack or dismantle institutions and challenge legal norms for political gain, a further entrenchment of neoliberalism, and more political participation in spaces where it is not welcome or protected. Law professors are increasingly viewed as a bulwark against this decay in democratic dialogue; as the search by civil society and others intensifies for public intellectuals who are able and willing to contribute to socio-political causes. Those who do this work will usually manage to categorize it as research, clinical teaching or community service, however it often seems like the unspoken component of our job description. For some, this work has resulted in being attacked by one version or another of a SLAPP: generally understood as punishment via legal process for political participation. None of this is new, but it seems like we are in a ‘new normal’ for engaging in law and public policy reform and related advocacy work outside of teaching assignments. This roundtable will provide an opportunity to share experiences with peers, and generate a deeper understanding of the benefits and challenges of this work. The discussion may include topics such as: how this contributes to our teaching and research, the socio-political context driving our engagement in these activities, the perils of finding yourself in the media and public spotlight, the personal and professional implications of this work, and why this work still does not factor comfortably into promotion and tenure (even when it is included as clinical teaching. If you would like to contribute to the roundtable or have any questions, please reach out to Shaun Fluker, University of Calgary Faculty of Law. Email: [email protected]

Experiments in Teaching in a World of Generative AI - Audrey Fried (Osgoode OPD)

This roundtable will provide a forum to discuss ways that different law teachers have adapted to the ready availability of generative AI tools such as ChatGPT. We hope to include examples of courses that embrace the use of generative AI tools as well as courses that are designed to resist the use of such tools. If you would like to participate in the roundtable or have any questions, please get in touch with Audrey Fried at [email protected]

“Legal Issues in Housing and Homelessness” Anna Lund (Alberta), Sarah Buhler (Saskatchewan), Estair Van Wagner (Osgoode) 

This roundtable will focus on legal Issues in housing and homelessness. We will have a structured conversation around our own research projects, currently underway in this area. Our conversation will be structured through a series of pre-agreed-upon questions. We hope that the roundtable will provide participants with a chance to get feedback on existing projects, but also to draw connections between discrete areas of legal research (e.g., residential tenancies law, encampment litigation, Indigenous rights). If you would like to participate in the roundtable or have any questions, please contact Anna Lund. Email: [email protected].

IP and tech law teaching and pedagogy - Graham Reynolds (Allard UBC)

This roundtable provides participants with an opportunity to discuss a range of issues relating to teaching and pedagogy in the areas of intellectual property and technology law. Roundtable participants will share their experiences of courses taught in these areas, along with courses that they would like to teach should they have the opportunity to do so. As well, participants will discuss some of the challenges and successes that they have experienced as IP/tech law teachers, including those relating to generative AI. For this roundtable, we frame teaching broadly, which gives participants the opportunity to discuss certain types of research dissemination to broader public audiences, including through blogging, social media, and open access publications. If you would like to contribute to the roundtable or have any questions, please reach out to Graham Reynolds. Email: [email protected].

Co-Teaching in Law Schools - David Sandomierski (Western)

This roundtable aims to share experiences of co-teaching in law schools – whether between academics and practitioners, or among academics. We hope to share experiences and perspectives on the possibilities, successes, missed opportunities, and relevance of this pedagogical strategy for legal education. If you would like to contribute to the roundtable or have any questions, please contact David Sandomierski. Email: [email protected].

Shifting Demographics of Faculty and Students in Canadian Law Schools - Eliza Xue (UNB)

I am new to UNB and new to Canada. From the perspective of a new member to the law teachers' community and to this country, I have particular interest in exploring the impact and challenges brought by the shifting demographics of our students and faculty members.

The society of Canada keeps changing over time, so as our campuses across the country, from a settler-oriented framework which laid down the legal foundation for this country, to an awakening tide of incorporating indigenous perspectives and knowledge into course syllabus, then to integrating incoming tides of immigrants, who bring along their own culture, values and religion, and who keep enlarging groups of both students and faculty on campuses and keep shifting demographics on the land. The uniqueness of the Canadian society calls for unique perspectives of law education and unique approaches of teaching law.

I propose a roundtable discussion on how we can identify and grasp this uniqueness brought by the shifting demographics of our teaching-learning community from the following three perspectives: (1) What are the core values entrenched in the Canadian law by the English common law tradition and development over time by generations of Canadian judicial elites? These core values have defined what Canada is and shall be the key ingredients in law teaching. It is proposed that all newcomers, be they students or faculty members, shall embrace these core values in learning and teaching law. (2) The possible tension between indigenization and multiculturalism: how the indigenous traditional knowledge and customs would affect the traditional law teaching, and how to address the concept and idea of reconciliation in a class composing of a substantial number of immigrant students who might have little knowledge of this concern. On what basis and to what extent that indigenization and multiculturalism could be harmonized in the setting of teaching & learning law. (3) From a practical perspective, how could we manage our class effectively when handling students' requests which are inspired by their own culture and past experience in their country of origin, such as requesting extra marks on the basis that English is not their native language, and asking questions as to what particular words mean during an exam, etc, which might potentially trigger equity consideration.

If you woud like to to contribute to the roundtable or have any questions, please contact Eliza Xue. Email: [email protected].

Teaching Race and Contract Law: Confronting, Countering and Reconstituting Legal Narratives  - Constance MacIntosh, Melisa Marsman, Suzie Dunn (Schulich Dalhousie)

Contract law is a core course in the first year curriculum of all Canadian law schools, helping to set norms and expectations about legal actors and how the law frames and evaluates lived experience. We wish to bring people together to talk about how race does or should play into our teaching. We are motivated to seek this conversation because race plays a role in contracts, from negotiation to remedies, however it is less common to see discussions about the ways that race is engaged in this area of law, compared to other core first year courses.

We note that there is existing literature on the relationship between contract law and racial profiling and racism, and legislative tools to counter racism in contracting. There are cases and case studies that discuss historical and current examples of racial discrimination in contracts, whether that be quantifiable price difference in car sales among purchasers of different races, AI that sets different prices for people based on racial proxies, rules that prohibited people of colour people from entering contracts to purchase homes in certain neighbourhoods, or how the contractual benefits received by Black and Indigenous soldiers were different than those offered to white soldiers.

We welcome insights and experiences about the challenges and benefits when we engage with race in a systemically racist society in the mundane and everyday world of contract law. We further want to consider the ways that contracts law could potentially be used as a tool to address racial inequality in contracts. We invite participants to consider such questions as “How do I decide what to teach about race and racialization? How can teaching future contracts lawyers about race make them better lawyers in practice? Do I feel like I have the right balance in my materials? How (or when) do we discuss judges’ decisions to either flag race in their reasons or leave it out? What feels wrong (or right) when I teach race and contracting? What do I want to do differently or better?” If you would like to contribute to the roundtable or have any questions, please reach out to Constance MacIntosh. Email: [email protected].

 


Lakehead Law Journal CFP

October 2023

The Lakehead Law Journal is a refereed, open access journal that publishes articles, case comments, book reviews, and book notes on legal issues in Canada. The LLJ is run by an Editorial Team made up of both students and faculty, with Professor Tenille E. Brown serving as Editor-in-Chief.

Call for Submissions

The LLJ is pleased to invite submissions for our next issue. The LLJ fills a significant niche in the legal scholarship landscape by focusing on the following mandates: (1) Aboriginal and Indigenous legal issues; (2) rural, northern, and small firm practice; and/or (3) natural resources and environmental law.

We also publish papers that are shorter than typical academic articles. Our hope is that shorter pieces (7000 words) will be more accessible to busy lawyers and judges, making them more likely to be cited in judgments and play a part in shaping the law. We invite you to view our latest publication Volume 5 Issue 2

Please visit llj.lakeheadu.ca for information on the online submission process, requirements, and journal policies. All new authors seeking to make a submission must register on the site. The registration process is simple and once registered, authors can not only submit work, but also review the status of their submissions.

Any inquiries should be directed to Kyle Morton, Managing Editor (Fall 2023), at [email protected] or to Professor Tenille Brown, Editor-in-Chief, at

[email protected].

The LLJ appreciates all submissions and is committed to providing an update on the status of submissions within six weeks.

Submissions will begin to be reviewed and considered for publication on a rolling basis for annual publication.

 

Lakehead Law Journal

[email protected]

llj.lakeheadu.ca


ACPD-CALT Response/ réponse: Examen de l'exigence nationale/Review of the National Requirement

la version française suit

 

Read more

UBC Black stream hire (Associate or Full Prof)


Academic Employment Opportunities at Osgoode Hall Law School Deadline October 10


Bulletin January 2023


Professors Backhouse and Arthurs Respond to the FLSC National Requirement Review Committee

 


Associate or Full Professor Indigenous Faculty Appointment: UBC Allard School of Law Deadline November 5, 2023


National Requirement Review Committee Discussion Paper

On September 26, 2023 CALT held an online discussion forum to discuss the proposals in the National Requirement Review Committee's Discussion paper and to consult about CALT's response to the Federation of Canadian Law Societies. 

We urged all attendees to consider the proposals, to let their colleagues know about this, and to consider putting their comments in before the October 16 2023 deadline (send to [email protected]).  The Discussion Paper is here (english only). The current version of the National Requirement is here

More about the National Requirement

"The National Requirement, developed by the Task Force on the Canadian Common Law Degree (“Task Force”), was adopted by the Council of the Federation in 2009 and approved by Canada’s law societies in 2010. ....

The National Requirement specifies the skills and competencies required of both domestically and internationally trained graduates to be eligible for bar admission programs and establishes criteria for assessing proposals for new law school programs in Canada. ...

The Council of the Federation established the Canadian Common Law Program Approval Committee (“Approval Committee”) in 2012, with a mandate to assess compliance with the National Requirement....

(see National Requirement Review Committee Discussion Paper 2023 here 11)

Summary of FLSC Proposals 

 

(click here for a ppt of these slides to use, share, download)

ACPD-CALT continues work on our response to the FLSC which will be posted once submitted. You can see some of the earlier correspondence with the FLSC during this Review round, here:

CALT's June 2023 Letter

 

CALT'S December 2022 Letter

 

 


Call for papers for RDUS special issue: Law and Technology (Nov. 15, 2023)

h/t  Prof. Andréanne Malacket
Editor R.D.U.S.

 

Call for papers:  Law and Technology (special issue to be published in the Winter of 2025) 

pdf Appel de textes en francais   

pdf Call in English 

The Revue de droit de l’Université de Sherbrooke (RDUS) is launching a general call for papers on the theme of Law and Technology. New technologies, in particular artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics, have come to dominate our daily activities. Autonomous vehicles, agents and weapons, mass surveillance, robot-judges, targeted advertising, conversational agents and social networks are all implicated by this emerging trend. TheChatGPT conversational tool, developed by OpenAI, has sparked debate about the benefits and risks of AI systems on a societal scale.

The increasingly widespread use of these new technologies has prompted new ways of thinking about, and shaping, the law. At the federal level, Bill C-27 proposes a framework for AI, raising questions about both the substance of the related legal rules and constitutional jurisdiction. In the absence of specific regulations for digital practices, other ethical or technical standards – such as the Montréal Declaration for a Responsible Development of Artificial Intelligence (2018) – have become the main source of guidance.

While this type of initiative may counter weaknesses in the current law, such alternative normative instruments can also push the law forward on digital issues – issues that are both extremely diverse and intersecting. For example, how can algorithmic governance be regulated? How can we preserve and encourage digital innovation while also supervising the so-called “responsible” deployment of AI? How can we limit AI’s impact on privacy and other human rights? How can we best frame automated decision-making? Is it possible to counter the “black box” of algorithms with greater transparency? How can we ensure that AI does not rely on discriminatory biases or contribute to the marginalization of vulnerable groups? How does and how will artificial intelligence affect the practice of law and the broader legal profession? What legal or normative frameworks are needed to regulate AI-related products and applications, such as generative AI, robots or other autonomous devices?

Courts, too, have recently embarked on a digital shift. The modernization of the justice system, including the computerization of court registries, raises a number of questions. Is this modernization properly supervised? Can such an initiative promote access to justice? Can the judicial system learn from the experience of the administrative justice system – such as the Tribunal administratif du travail – with regard to the use of technology in proceedings? How should we think about digital evidence? Are the current legal rules found in part in articles 2837 ff. of the Civil Code of Québec and in the Act to Establish a Legal Framework for Information Technology, CQLR, c. C-1.1 adequate for the state of technology in 2023? 

The RDUS invites members of the legal community in Canada to submit works on thesecritical issues. We welcome engagement on a range of topics, including but not limited to:

  • Access to justice
  • Right to privacy and data protection
  • Health law
  • Environmental law
  • Contract law
  • Labour and employment law
  • Fundamental rights and freedoms
  • Private international law
  • Ethics and law of artificial intelligence
  • Governance and regulation
  • Legal interpretation
  • Pedagogy and university teaching
  • Evidence and civil procedure
  • Intellectual property
  • Civil liability
  • Society and religion

Works should be between 15,000 and 23,000 words in length (inclusive of notes).

They may be submitted by November 15th, 2023, by email to: [email protected]

Works will be selected by Profs. Anne-Sophie Hulin and Charles-Étienne Daniel, in collaboration with Prof. Andréanne Malacket, editor of the RDUS.

Each submission will undergo a double-blind peer review process. Authors must comply with the RDUS editorial policy, available on the Université de Sherbrooke Faculté de droit website: https://www.usherbrooke.ca/droit/recherche/publications/revue-de-droit-deuniversite-de-sherbrooke-rdus.

The RDUS is also proud to announce that the publication of this special issue is made possible by the OBVIA, the ADAJ project, the Chaire-miroir Ottawa-Lyon, the Chaire de recherche I.A. responsible à l’échelle mondiale, the CrRDG and the SoDRUS. A $1,000 “Prix de la Chaire Justice sociale et intelligence artificielle” (Fondation Abeona / ENS-PSL / OBVIA) will also be awarded to the emerging author (student, junior researcher, assistant professor) who publishes the most significant and innovative contribution in this special issue. The recipient will be selected jointly by the scientific directors of the special issue and by the editor of the RDUS, as well as the RDUS scientific committee.

***

The Revue de droit de l’Université de Sherbrooke was founded in 1970 to promote the publication of legal research. The RDUS accepts original texts in both French and English. It also publishes works with a multi-disciplinary scope or that offer a perspective that goes beyond the strict classical framework of legal positivism.

Prof. Andréanne Malacket

Editor, RDUS


Recap: Wellness in Law Schools: Talking about Techniques and Tensions

On June 26 CALT held a Joint online Session with the Association of Law Teachers UK on Wellness.  Members are encouraged to submit items of interest on this subject to CALT, and we will work on a repository.

 

 

The materials for the session are available as well:

A Resources document linking speaker bios and providing an extensive list of research resources including all those mentioned in the session.  This is a google document available for download. 

The Draft Guidelines for Mental Wellbeing in Legal Education prepared by Dr. Emma J. Jones, Sr. Lecturer and Director of Student Wellbeing at University of Sheffield School of Law UK, Professor Caroline Strevens, University of Portsmouth, Professor Rachael Field, Bond University, Australia; and Dr Colin James, ANU, Australia, in association with UK Association of Law Teachers and the International Bar Association are available here.  Dr. Jones welcomes all comments on this draft, you can write to her at  [email protected]

Finally, from Kate Fischer Doherty Director of the Public Interest Law Initiative and Director of Clinics at Melbourne Law School at the University of Melbourne comes this save the date, below the jump.


 

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ALT + CALT Present Wellness in Law Schools: Talking about Techniques and Tensions, Jun 26 11AM EST

ACPD-CALT SUMMER SESSIONS 2023

ALL INFORMATION IN THIS POSTER IS AVAILABLE IN THE WEB POSTJune 26 2023 11:00 am EST via zoom. Wellness in Law Schools: Talking about Techniques & Tensions Presented in collaboration with the Association of Law Teachers (ALT) UK  Registration is required https://bit.ly/ALTCALTWellness  This session will be available as a recording on the ACPD-CALT.org website.  Institutions related to the legal profession in many jurisdictions have begun to recognize a serious and, it seems, increasing, level of mental unwellness amongst lawyers as well as law students. This panel will focus on the question of wellness in law schools.  A set of Draft Guidelines Mental Wellbeing in Legal Education prepared by  Emma J. Jones, Sr. Lecturer and Director of Student Wellbeing at University of Sheffield School of Law UK, Professor Caroline Strevens, University of Portsmouth, UK Professor Rachael Field, Bond University, Australia; and Dr Colin James, ANU, Australiadd, the UK Association of Law Teachers and the International Bar Association will be shared with all participants.  The Panel will reflect on some of the many complex tensions which arise in efforts to promote wellness in law schools. These tensions include whether wellness initiatives should be broadly or narrowly targeted, the extent to which wellness initiatives themselves can create more time pressure on students, and the problem of limited resources, particularly for evaluation studies. Specific initiatives that Panellists have been involved with will also form part of the discussion. Contributions and questions from all participants will be welcome time permitting.  Specific initiatives that Panellists have been involved with will also form part of the discussion. Contributions and questions from all participants will be welcome time permitting. All registered participants will receive a copy of the Draft Guidelines and an annotated list of resources on wellness in law schools.  Panellists:  Dr. Emma Jones Sr. Lecturer and Director of Student Wellbeing at University of Sheffield School of Law UK,  Professor Caroline Strevens, University of Portsmouth, UK  Commentators   Professor Gemma Smyth (Windsor)  Professor Amy Salyzyn (University of Ottawa, president of the Canadian Association for Legal Ethics) .   Chair: Professor Sonia Lawrence (Osgoode Hall Law School, President of the Canadian Association of Law Teachers).June 26 2023 11:00 am EST 

Wellness in Law Schools: Talking about Techniques & Tensions

Presented in collaboration with the Association of Law Teachers (ALT) UK

Registration is required https://bit.ly/ALTCALTWellness

This session will be available as a recording on the ACPD-CALT.org website at a later date

Institutions related to the legal profession in many jurisdictions have begun to recognize a serious and, it seems, increasing, level of mental unwellness amongst lawyers as well as law students. This panel will focus on the question of wellness in law schools.

A set of Draft Guidelines on Mental Wellbeing in Legal Education prepared by

  • Emma J. Jones, Sr. Lecturer and Director of Student Wellbeing at University of Sheffield School of Law UK,
  • Professor Caroline Strevens, University of Portsmouth, UK
  • Professor Rachael Field, Bond University, Australia;
  • and Dr Colin James, ANU, Australia,
  • UK Association of Law Teachers
  • International Bar Association

will be shared with all participants.

The Panel will reflect on some of the many complex tensions which arise in efforts to promote wellness in law schools. These tensions include whether wellness initiatives should be broadly or narrowly targeted, the extent to which wellness initiatives themselves can create more time pressure on students, and the problem of limited resources, particularly for evaluation studies. Specific initiatives that Panellists have been involved with will also form part of the discussion. Contributions and questions from all participants will be welcome time permitting.  Specific initiatives that Panellists have been involved with will also form part of the discussion. Contributions and questions from all participants will be welcome time permitting. All registered participants will receive a copy of the Draft Guidelines and an annotated list of resources on wellness in law schools.

Panellists:

Dr. Emma Jones Sr. Lecturer and Director of Student Wellbeing at University of Sheffield School of Law UK,

Professor Caroline Strevens, University of Portsmouth, UK

Commentators 

Associate Professor Gemma Smyth (Windsor)

Associate Professor Amy Salyzyn (University of Ottawa, president of the Canadian Association for Legal Ethics) . 

Chair: Associate Professor Sonia Lawrence (Osgoode Hall Law School, President of the Canadian Association of Law Teachers).

 


Summer Session Recap: Experts Chat about Chat GPT

Recorded on Jun 12 2023. Enregistré le 12 juin 2023

  • Pour les sous-titres français auto-traduits, veuillez cliquer sur Parametres > Sous titres > Traduire Automatiquement
  • Si vous ne voyez pas "Traduire Automatiquement, choisissez "English".
  • Lorsque les sous-titres apparaissent, veuillez cliquer sur Traduire Automatiquement > français.

Links and Suggestions re other resources + biographies of Chat Experts (en)

Notes from the Roundtable  [These notes were produced by CALT, using the transcript of this Roundtable and liberally deleting and editing]

 

 

 


Experts Chat about ChatGPT Mon Jun 12, 2PM EST via zoom

This session is part of ACPD-CALT Summer Sessions 2023. 

Experts Chat about ChatGPT:   Curriculum and Context

Monday June 12 2PM EST via ZOOM

Your expert colleagues talk teaching, evaluation and tech, helping law profs revise, augment and improve law teaching & (content and evaluation) in a world with easily accessible AI.

Registration required, here

With

Prof Alexandra Mogoryos, Toronto Metropolitan University, Lincoln Alexander Faculty of Law

Audrey Fried Director, Faculty & Curriculum Development, Osgoode OPD, York University

Prof. Katie Szilagyi, University of Manitoba Faculty of Law

Prof. Kristen Thomasen Allard Faculty of Law, UBC

Prof. Jon Penny, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University

Prof Valerio de Stefano, Canada Research Chair in Innovation, Law and Society, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University

Prof. Wolfgang Alschner, Hyman Soloway Chair in Business and Trade Law, Ottawa Faculty of Law

Links and Suggestions re other resources + biographies of Chat Experts

Poster for event. All information in the poster is contained in the blog post. The poster has an abstract design.


CALT @ Congress @ York May 28-30 2023

Program

Abstracts and Bios long program

Tuesday AGM Materials /documents pour l'AGA de mardi (en/fr)

CLSA Monday Program (overlap day)

 

NOTICE:   ACPD CALT SUMMER SESSIONS 2023

Monday Jun 12, 2023 2:00 PM  EST.

Experts Chat about ChatGPT:

Curriculum and Context

This roundtable of law, tech and teaching experts from Canadian Law Schools will try to put what's new about Chat GPT into context for law teachers.  Should we teach about ChatGPT, and how?  How might ChatGPT be integrated into legal work?  And how can we design meaningful evaluations in a world where Chat GPT is a click away? 

Prof Alexandra Mogoryos, Toronto Metropolitan University, Lincoln Alexander Faculty of Law

Audrey Fried Director, Faculty & Curriculum Development, Osgoode OPD

Prof. Katie Szilagyi, University of  Manitoba Faculty of Law 

Prof. Kirsten Thomasen, Allard Faculty of Law, UBC

Prof. Jon Penny, Osgoode Hall Law School

Prof Valerio de Stefano, Canada Research Chair in Innovation, Law and Society, Osgoode Hall Law School

Prof. Wolfgang Alschner, Hyman Soloway Chair in Business and Trade Law, Ottawa Faculty of Law

Registration required, register here: https://bit.ly/ChatChatGPT

 

Monday Jun 26, 2023 11:00 AM  EST

Wellness in Law Schools:

Talking about Techniques and Tensions

Presented in collaboration with the Association of Law Teachers (UK).

Institutions related to the legal profession in many jurisdictions have begun to recognize a serious and, it seems, increasing, level of mental unwellness amongst lawyers as well as law students.  This panel will focus on the question of wellness in law schools.  A set of Draft Guidelines for law schools prepared by  Emma J. Jones, Sr. Lecturer and Director of Student Wellbeing at University of Sheffield School of Law UK, Professor Caroline Strevens, University of Portsmouth, UK; Professor Rachael Field, Bond University, Australia; and Dr Colin James, ANU, Australia), the UK Association of Law Teachers and the International Bar Association on developing International Guidelines for Mental Wellbeing in Legal Education will be shared with all participants.  Panellists (TBA) will offer feedback on the guidelines.  The Panel will reflect on some of the many complex tensions which arise in efforts to promote wellness in law schools.  These tensions include whether wellness initiatives should be broadly or narrowly targeted, the extent to which wellness initiatives themselves can create more time pressure on students, and the problem of limited resources, particularly for evaluation studies.  Specific initiatives that Panellists have been involved with will also form part of the discussion.  Contributions and questions from all participants will be welcome time permitting. All registered  participants will receive a copy of the Draft Guidelines and an annotated list of resources on wellness in law schools.

Registration required, register here: https://bit.ly/ALTCALTWellness


UVIC positions available: Applications considered starting May 1 2023

Two Assistant or Associate Professor, Assistant or Associate Teaching Professor positions open at UVIC. The Committee will begin considering applications on 1 May 2023 until the positions are filled.  See here for the full job listings. Tell your friends. 

Position 1

The Faculty invites applications for one full-time research or teaching-stream faculty position. The
appointment will be at the rank of Assistant Professor, Assistant Teaching Professor, Associate Professor
or Associate Teaching Professor, with rank and tenure status determined after an assessment of
accomplishments and experience. The expected start date is 1 July 2023 or as negotiated.

This position is a Preferential Hire. In accordance with the University’s Equity Plan and pursuant to
Section 42 of the BC Human Rights Code, preference will be given to Black scholars. Candidates from
this group who wish to qualify for preferential consideration must self-identify in their cover letter. We
encourage applicants for all positions to self-identify other characteristics relevant to UVic Law’s
diversity commitments.

We are interested in hearing from all exceptional candidates regardless of subject-matter expertise. The
successful candidate must have the interest and capacity to teach first-year private law courses,
particularly first-year Property or Torts in the JD or JD/JID program. In addition, applications from
candidates with research or teaching interests in labour law, employment law, or dispute resolution are
especially welcome.


Position 2

The Faculty invites applications for one full-time research or teaching-stream faculty position. The
appointment will be at the rank of Assistant Professor, Assistant Teaching Professor, Associate Professor
or Associate Teaching Professor, with rank and tenure status determined after an assessment of
accomplishments and experience. The expected start date is 1 July 2023 or as negotiated.

This position is open to all applicants. We encourage applicants for all positions to self-identify
characteristics relevant to UVic Law’s diversity commitments.

We are interested in hearing from all exceptional candidates regardless of subject-matter expertise. The
successful candidate must have the interest and capacity to teach first-year private law courses,
particularly first-year Property or Torts in the JD or JD/JID program. In addition, applications from
candidates with research or teaching interests in labour law, employment law, or dispute resolution are
especially welcome.

We are particularly interested in candidates who can, or are interested in, teaching and conducting
research in a transsystemic or comparative way, including those with qualifications in more than one legal
tradition or jurisdiction. All candidates should have the capacity and desire to take part in the mentorship
and supervision of graduate students.

 

 


Feb 10 Regulation of Lawyers .... and Law Schools? How ongoing debates about lawyer licensing affect law schools and legal education

Regulation of Lawyers .... and Law Schools?  How ongoing debates about lawyer licensing affect law schools and legal education

Hosted by ACPD-CALT 

Feb 10 2023 1130 PST, 1230 MST, 130 CST, 230EST 330 AST

 

Please join us to hear about the challenges, ideas and changes which bring together regulators and law schools.  Register here:  https://yorku.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYufuisrD0rE9dQb0zE7vqFlPUGq5yF4BWm

Other important links: 

Federation of Law Societies of Canada

Approved Canadian common law programs: 

National Requirement Review

National Committee on Accreditation:

 

CALT Letters re Current Review

November 2022

January 2021

 

Canadian Council of Law Deans Principles on the Role of Law Faculties in Lawyer Education

Report from the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System: "The Whole Lawyer"

Furlong, A Competence-Based System For Lawyer Licensing in British Columbia report to LSBC, May 2022

 

Panelists

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